Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Ed Ou - Arviat, Canada. October 31, 2014. Janet Ayalok (right) lies on a polar bear that she shot moments earlier. Polar bear hunting in Nunavut works on a lottery tag system for eligible Inuit hunters. Ten names are drawn; the chosen have 48 hours to successfully kill a polar bear – if not, their tag goes to another hunter. A rapid change in climate has led to water freezing later in the year, forcing the polar bears migration for seal hunting to change. Searching elsewhere for food, they often enter human settlements causing a cultural shift in the community towards the polar bears, and a concerning change for the animals in their way of living.

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Jonas Bendiksen 
- Kurigram District, Bangladesh. 2010. Men move the community mosque that was threatened by river erosion. In this flood prone area, buildings are built to be able to be dismantled and moved in a single day. 

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 Ruben Salgado Escudero 
- Shan State, Burma, February 17, 2014. Village leaders walk through Gaung Village Inn, illuminated by their new solar panel lighting system. Only 27% of Burma’s population is connected to a power grid, making solar energy a viable solution for many communities. Inexpensive and small, photovoltaic systems can increase productivity without additional cost, a compelling option for their future.

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Yuyang Liu 
- Guangzhou, China. March 30, 2015. Two men fish in the pond of Xian Village. This village is in the center of Guangzhou city and surrounded by high buildings and large mansions. A conflict between locals and real estate developers has lasted for more than 7 years because of the uneven compensation and the corruption of Xian village leaders.

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Matilde Gattoni 
- Kpogbor, Ghana. February 9, 2016. The last man living on Kpogbor island stands in front of his makeshift sea defense wall in order to protect what is left of his house. As a consequence of global warming, over 7,000km of coastline from Mauritania to Cameroon are eroding at a pace of up to 36 meters per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments focus on salvaging big cities, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold. In less than 20 years, the ancient coastline of Ghana and Togo are now on the brink of extinction.

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Arati Kumar 
- Rao-Harintanna, Sundarbans Forest, Bangladesh. August 24, 2014. The son of a fisherman huddles inside a boat away from the rain, awaiting the return of his father. The threatening mix of commercial overfishing, planned coal-fired power plants and climate change are stripping them of their traditional livelihood, forcing a migration to cities for unreliable daily wage work.The Sundarbans, which straddles the border between India and Bangladesh, is the largest unbroken strand of mangroves in the world and the first line of defense against rising sea levels.